PreviousNext
Page 1464
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

W

WAD to WARP
WAD
WAFT
WAIST
WAKE
WALE-KNOT or WALL-KNOT
WALE-REARED
WALES
WALL-SIDED
WALT
WARP

WASH to WATER-LINES

WATER-LOGGED to WAY of a ship

WEARING to WELL-ROOM

WHARF to WIND

WIND to WINDLASS

WINDSAIL to WRECK


Search

Contact us

WARP

WARP, (cordelle, Fr.) a small rope employed occasionally to remove a ship from one place to another, in a port, road, or river. And hence,

To WARP, (remorquer, Fr.) is to change the situation of a ship, by pulling her from one part of a harbour, &c. to some other, by means of warps, which are attached to buoys; to anchors sunk in the bottom; or to certain stations upon the shore, as pofts, rings, trees, &c. The ship is accordingly drawn forwards to those stations, either by pulling on the warps by hand, or by the application of some purchase, as a tackle, windlass, or capstern, upon her deck. See those articles.

When this operation is performed by the ship's lesser anchors, these machines, together with their warps, are carried out in the boats alternately towards the place where the ship is endeavouring to arrive: so that when she is drawn up close to one anchor, the other is carried out to a competent distance before her, and being sunk, serves to fix the other warp by which the is further advanced.

Warping is generally used when the sails are unbent, or when they cannot be successfully employed, which may either arise from the unfavourable state of the wind, the opposition of the tide, or the narrow limits of the channel.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 311, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1464