PreviousNext
Page 1461
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

W

WAD to WARP
WAD
WAFT
WAIST
WAKE
WALE-KNOT or WALL-KNOT
WALE-REARED
WALES
WALL-SIDED
WALT
WARP

WASH to WATER-LINES

WATER-LOGGED to WAY of a ship

WEARING to WELL-ROOM

WHARF to WIND

WIND to WINDLASS

WINDSAIL to WRECK


Search

Contact us

WALES

WALES, (preceintes, Fr.) an assemblage of strong planks extending along a ship's side, throughout her whole length, at different heighths, and serving to reinforce the decks, and form the curves by which the vessel appears light and graceful on the water.

As the wales are framed of planks broader and thicker than the rest, they resemble ranges of hoops encircling the sides and bows. They are usually distinguished into the main-wale and the channel-wale; the breadth and thickness of which are expressed by Q and R in the MIDSHIP-FRAME, plate VII. and their length is exhibited in the ELEVATION, plate I. where L Q Z is the main-wale, and D R X the channel-wale, parallel to the former.

Plate 1Plate 7

Plates I and VII

The situation of the wales, being ascertained by no invariable rule, is generally submitted to the fancy and judgment of the builder. The position of the gun-ports and scuppers ought, however, to be particularly considered on this occasion, that the wales may not be wounded by too many breaches.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 311, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1461