PreviousNext
Page 1414
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

T

TABLING to TAIL

TAIL-BLOCK to TENDING

TENON to TIDE

TIER to TOGGEL

TOMPION to TOPPING

TOPPING-LIFT to TRACT-SCOUT

TRACTING to TREE-NAILS

TRESTLE-TREES to TRIP

TRIPPING to TRYING
TRIPPING
TROUGH
TROWSERS
TRUCK
Speaking-TRUMPET
Fire-TRUNK
TRUNNIONS
TRUSS
TRUSS-PARREL
TRYING

TUCK to TYE


Search

Contact us

TRUSS

TRUSS, (trousse, Fr.) a machine employed to pull a yard home to its respective mast, and retain it firmly in that position.

As the truss is generally used instead of a parrel, it is rarely employed, except in flying top-gallant-sails, which are never furnished with parrels. It is no other than a ring or traveller, which encircles the mast, and has a rope fastened to its after-part, leading downward to the top or decks; by means of which the truss may be straitened or slackened at pleasure. The haliards of the top-gallant-sail being passed through this ring; and the sail being hoisted up to its utmost extent; it is evident, that the yard will be drawn close to the mast, by pulling down the truss close to the upper part of the sail. For, without the truss, the sail and its yard would be blown from the mast, so as to swing about, by the action of the wind, and the rolling of the vessel; unless the yard were hoisted close up to the pulley wherein the haliards run; which seldom is the case in flying top-gallant sails, because they are usually much shallower than those which are fixed or standing.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 301, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1414