PreviousNext
Page 1243
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

S

SADDLE to To strike SAIL

SAILING to SALUTE

SALUTE to SCHOONER

SCOOP to SEA-COAST

SEA-CLOTHS to SENDING

SENNIT to SHANK

SHANK-PAINTER to SHEET

SHEET-ANCHOR to SHIP

SHIP to SHIP-SHAPE

SHIPPING to SHOT

SHOT to SLAB-LINE

SLACK-WATER to SNATCH-BLOCK

SNOTTER to SPILL

SPILLING-LINES to SPRING A LEAK
SPILLING-LINES
SPINDLE
SPIRKETING
To SPLICE
SPLIT
SPOON-DRIFT
SPOONING
SPRAY
SPRING
SPRING A LEAK

SPRINGING THE LUFF to SQUALL

SQUARE to STANDING-WATER

STARBOARD to STEM

STEMSON to STEWARD

STIFF to STRAKES or STREAKS

STRAND to STUDDING-SAILS

STUFF to SWEEPER of the sky

SWEEPING to To SWING


Search

Contact us

SPINDLE

SPINDLE, (baton de giroüette, Fr.) a sort of iron-pin tapering at the upper end to the point. It is used to stick into the upper end of the top-gallant-mast, so as to carry a vane, which, turning thereon horizontally, will show the direction of the wind. It is usually crowned with a globular or conical piece of wood called the acorn, which prevents the vane from being blown off. See ACORN.

SPINDLE is also the lower end or foot of the capstern, which is shod with iron, and becomes the pivot or axis upon which it turns in the saucer. See the article CAPSTERN.

To SPLICE

To SPLICE, (episeer, Fr. splitster, Dutch, plico Lat.) to join the two ends of a rope together, or to unite the end of a rope to any other part thereof.

There are several different methods of performing this operation, according to the services on which it is to be employed. Thus, there is the short-splice, the long-splice, the eye-splice, and the cunt-splice; all of which are calculated for different purposes.

The short-splice is made by untwisting the ends of two ropes, or the two ends of on rope, and, having placed each of the strands of one opposite to and in the interval between two strands of the other, to draw them close together; and then interweave the strands of one into the alternate strands of the other, by penetrating the latter with sid or marline-spike, parallel to the axis or length of the rope. This splice is used on the cables, slings, block-strops, and in general all ropes which are not intended to run through blocks, or where the splice is not in danger of being loosened or separated.

The long splice, being fixed in three places, occupies a greater extent of the rope; but, by the division of the joinings, the bulk is also divided into different parts of its length. Hence it is much neater and smoother than the short-splice, and better adapted to run through the channel of a block, &c. for which use it is generally calculated.

The eye-splice being intended to make a sort of eye or circle at the end of a rope, the strands are untwisted, and their extremities thrust through the three strands in that part of the said rope, whereon the splice is to be formed, and thence passing over the surface of the second strand, they are again thrust through the third, which completes the operation.

The cunt-splice is constructed in the same manner as the eye-splice, being no other than the ends of two lines fastened together at a short distance from each other, the extremities of either being interwoven into the bight of the other, so that the line becomes double in the extent of the splice. This is chiefly used in lead-lines, log-lines, and fishing-lines, where the short-splice would be liable to separation, as. being frequently loosened by the water.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 273, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1243