PreviousNext
Page 1225
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

S

SADDLE to To strike SAIL

SAILING to SALUTE

SALUTE to SCHOONER

SCOOP to SEA-COAST

SEA-CLOTHS to SENDING

SENNIT to SHANK

SHANK-PAINTER to SHEET

SHEET-ANCHOR to SHIP

SHIP to SHIP-SHAPE

SHIPPING to SHOT

SHOT to SLAB-LINE

SLACK-WATER to SNATCH-BLOCK
SLACK-WATER
SLATCH
SLEEPERS
SLINGS
SLIP
SLOOP
SLOOP OF WAR
To SLUE
SMACK
SNATCH-BLOCK

SNOTTER to SPILL

SPILLING-LINES to SPRING A LEAK

SPRINGING THE LUFF to SQUALL

SQUARE to STANDING-WATER

STARBOARD to STEM

STEMSON to STEWARD

STIFF to STRAKES or STREAKS

STRAND to STUDDING-SAILS

STUFF to SWEEPER of the sky

SWEEPING to To SWING


Search

Contact us

SLINGS

SLINGS, (elingue, Fr. flingan, Sax.) a rope whose ends are fixed in such a manner to its other part, as to encircle a cask, bale, or case, and suspend it whilst hoisting or lowering. Of these there are various sorts, according to the weight or figure of the object to which they are applied. Those which are most frequently used in lading and delivering ships are represented in fig. 9. plate IX. being nearly in the form of a pair of spectacles, the tackle being hooked to the middle part a, whilst b and c are fixed on the opposite quarters of the cask, &c.

Plate 9

Plate IX


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 270, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1225