PreviousNext
Page 1210
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

S

SADDLE to To strike SAIL

SAILING to SALUTE

SALUTE to SCHOONER

SCOOP to SEA-COAST

SEA-CLOTHS to SENDING

SENNIT to SHANK

SHANK-PAINTER to SHEET

SHEET-ANCHOR to SHIP

SHIP to SHIP-SHAPE

SHIPPING to SHOT
SHIPPING
SHIVERING
SHOAL
SHOE of the anchor
To SHOE an anchor
SHORE
BOLD-SHORE
To SHORTEN
SHOT

SHOT to SLAB-LINE

SLACK-WATER to SNATCH-BLOCK

SNOTTER to SPILL

SPILLING-LINES to SPRING A LEAK

SPRINGING THE LUFF to SQUALL

SQUARE to STANDING-WATER

STARBOARD to STEM

STEMSON to STEWARD

STIFF to STRAKES or STREAKS

STRAND to STUDDING-SAILS

STUFF to SWEEPER of the sky

SWEEPING to To SWING


Search

Contact us

SHOT

SHOT, a missive weapon, discharged by the force of enflamed powder from a fire-arm in battle.

The shot used in the sea-service is of various kinds, as bullets, bar-shot, chain-shot, case-shot, and grape-shot; all of which are used in the royal navy. There is besides other shot, of a more pernicious kind, used by privateers, and other piratical rovers; such are langrage, star-shot, fire-arrows, &c.

The first and most simple is the round-shot, which is a ball or globe of iron, whose weight is in proportion to the size of the cannon, or to the diameter of its bore.

The double-headed, or bar-Shot, fig. II. plate VII. are balls cut into two equal parts, and joined together by a kind of iron bar. In the French service the middle is sometimes filled with a composition, and the whole covered with linen dipped in brimstone; the cannon in firing also inflames the combustibles or composition of this ball, which sets fire to the sails of the vessel. One of the heads of this ball has an hole to receive a fuse, which, communicating with the charge of the cannon, sets fire to the bullet (Le Blond's Elements of War.).

Plate 7

Plate VII

The chain-shot, fig. 12. consists of two balls chained together, being principally designed to destroy the masts and rigging, which they are better fitted to perform than the single bullets.

Grape-shot is a combination of balls, fig. 13. Put into a thick canvas-bag, and corded strongly together, so as to form a sort of cylinder, whose diameter is equal to that of the ball which is adapted to the cannon. This shot is represented by fig. 13. on a larger scale, at the bottom of the plate.

Case-shot, fig. 14. is formed by putting a great quantity of musket-bullets into a cylindrical tinder-box called a canister. They are principally used by the French to scour the decks of the enemy.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 265, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1210