PreviousNext
Page 1045
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

R

RABBET to RAISING a purchase

RAKE to RATES

RATES to To REEVE
RATES
RATLINGS
REACH
REAR
REEF
REEFING
REEF-TACKLE
REEL of the log
To REEVE

RECKONING to RHOMB-LINE

RIBBANDS to RIGGING-OUT a boom

RIGHTING to ROBANDS, or ROPE BANDS

ROGUES-YARN to ROUND-HOUSE

ROUNDING to ROYAL

RUDDER to RUNNING-RIGGING


Search

Contact us
RATES to To REEVE

RATES

Rates.Guns.Length of the keel.Length of the lower deck.Extreme breadth.Depth in the hold.Burthen in tons.
Feet.Inch.Feet.Inch.Feet.Inch.Feet.Inch.
2d rate,Barfleur,901443/4177650211934
3d rate,Arrogant,7413816834741991644
3d rate,Europa,641391594441941366
4thrate,Salisbury5012081464041741044
5thrate,Phoenix,44116111409371⅜16856
5thrate,Venus,36106312841/2359124722
6thrate,Carysfort,289731/21184338106586
6thrate,Dolphin,2493411332111511
SloopNautilus,16807⅝98272128316

Nothing more evidently manifest the great improvement of the marine art, and the degree of perfection to which it has arrived in England, than the facility of managing our first rates; which were formerly esteemed incapable of government, unless in the most favourable weather of the summer. In testimony of this observation we may, with great propriety, produce the example of the Royal George, which, during the whole course of the late war, was known to be as easily navigated, and as capable of service, as any of the inferior ships of the line, and that frequently in the most tempestuous seasons of the year. The ingenious M. Du Hamel, who is eminently distinguished for his knowledge of marine affairs, has indeed judidiously objected to the defects and bad qualities of such large ships. The same gentleman observes, that a ship of two decks, such as are generally all those of the third and fourth rates, cannot be so strongly connected as is furnished with three: a vessel pierced for 15 guns on one side of her deck must necessarily be very long, and is sometimes apt to droop at the two ends; or, in the sea-phrase, to break her back under the enormous weight of her artillery.

Having already exhibited the dimensions of the largest first rate in our navy, we have, in the following table, collected those of the inferior rates:


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 237, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-1045