PreviousNext
Page 958
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

P

PACKET or PACKET-BOAT to PARSLING

PARTING to PAYING-OFF

PAYING-OUT, or PAYING-AWAY to PILOT

PIN of a block to PLANKING
PIN of a block
PINK
PINNACE
PINTLES
PIRATE
PITCH
To PITCH the seams
PITCHING
PLANE
PLANKING

PLAT to POLE-MAST

Under bare POLES to PRAM or PRAME

PRATIC to PROP

PROTEST to PURSER


Search

Contact us

PIRATE

PIRATE, (pirate, Fr. Oe??a??? Gr.) a sea-robber, or an armed ship that roams the seas without any legal commission, and seizes or plunders every vessel she meets indiscriminately, whether friends or enemies.

The colours usually displayed by pirates are laid to be a black field, with a death's head, a battle-axe and hour-glass. The last instrument is generally supposed to determine the time allowed to the prisoners, whom they take, to consider whether they will join the pirates in their felonious combination, or be put to death, which is often perpetrated in the most cruel manner.

Amongst the most celebrated pirates of the north is recorded Alvilda, daughter of a king of the Goths, named Sypardus. She embraced this occupation to deliver herself from the violence imposed on her inclination, by a marriage with Alf, fon of Sigarus, king of Denmark. She drest herself as a man, and composed her band of rowers, and the rest of her crew, of a number of young women, attired in the same manner. Amongst the first of her cruizes she touched at a place where a company of pirates bewailed the death of their captain. The strangers were captivated with the agreeable manners of Alvilda, and chose her for their chief. By this reinforcement she became so formidable upon the sea, that prince Alf came to engage her. She sustained his attacks for a considerable time; but, in a vigorous action, Alf boarded her vessel, and having killed the greatest part of her crew, feized the captain, namely herself; whom nevertheless he knew nor, because the princess had a casque which covered her visage. Being master of her person, he removed the casque, and in fpite of her disguise, instantly recognized her, and offered her his hand in wedlock. See Hist. Denmark, by Saxo Grammaticus.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 215, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0958