PreviousNext
Page 953
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

P

PACKET or PACKET-BOAT to PARSLING

PARTING to PAYING-OFF

PAYING-OUT, or PAYING-AWAY to PILOT
PAYING-OUT, or PAYING-AWAY
PEAK, or PEEK
PEEK-HALIARDS
PEN
PENDENT
PERIAGUA
PIER
PILLAGE
PILLOW
PILOT

PIN of a block to PLANKING

PLAT to POLE-MAST

Under bare POLES to PRAM or PRAME

PRATIC to PROP

PROTEST to PURSER


Search

Contact us

PILOT

PILOT, the officer who superintends the navigation, either upon the sea-coast or on the main ocean. It is, however, more particularly applied by our mariners to the person charged with the direction of a ship's course, on, or near the sea-coast, and into the roads, bays, rivers, havens, &c. within his respective district.

The regulations, with regard to pilots in the royal navy, are as follow:

"The commanders of the king's ships, in order to give all reasonable encouragement to so useful a body of men as pilots, and to remove all their objections to his majesty's service, are strictly charged to treat them with good usage, and an equal respect with warrant-officers.

"The purser of the ship is always to have a set of bedding provided on board for the pilots, and the captain is to order the boatswain to supply them with hammocs, and a convenient place to lie in, near their duty, and apart from the common men; which bedding and hammocs are to be returned when the pilots leave the ship.

"A pilot, when conducting One of his majesty's ships in pilot-water, shall have the sole charge and command of the ship, and may give orders for steering; setting, trimming, or furling the sails; tacking the ship; or whatever concerns the navigation: and the captain is to take care that all the officers and crew obey his orders. But the captain is diligently to observe the conduct of the pilot, and if he judges him to' behave so ill as to bring the ship into danger, he may remove him from the command and charge of the ship, and take such methods for her preservation as shall be judged necessary; remarking upon, the log-book the exact hour and time when the pilot was removed from his office, and the reasons assigned for it.

"Captains of the king's ships, employing pilots in foreign parts of his Majesty's dominions, shall, after performance of the service, give a certificate thereof to the pilot, which being produced to the proper naval-officer, he shall cause the same to be immediately paid; but if there be no naval-officer there, the captain of his. Majesty's ship shall pay him, and send the proper vouchers, with his bill, to the navy-board, in order to be paid as bills of exchange.

"Captains of his majesty's ships, employing foreign pilots, to carry the ships they command into, or out of foreign ports, shall pay them the rates due by the establishment or custom of the country, before they discharge them; whose receipts being duly vouched, and sent with a certificate of the service performed, to the navy-board, they shall cause them to be paid with the same exactness as they do. bills of exchange."

Regulations and Instructions of the Sea-service, &c.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 214, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0953