PreviousNext
Page 896
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

N

NAVAL to NO NEARER!

NO MANS LAND to NUTS of the anchor
NO MANS LAND
NORMAN
NUTS of the anchor


Search

Contact us
NO MANS LAND to NUTS of the anchor

NO MANS LAND

NO MAN'S LAND, (St. Aubinet, Fr.) a space between the after-part of the belfrey and the fore-part of a ship's boat, when the said boat is stowed upon the booms, as in a deep-waisted vessel. These booms are laid from the forecastle nearly to the quarter-deck, where their after-ends are usually sustained by a frame called the gallows, which consists of two strong posts, about six feet high, with a cross piece, reaching from one to the other, athwart -ships, and serving to support the ends of those booms, masts, and yards, which lie in reserve to supply the place of others carried away, &c. The space called No man's land is used to contain any blocks, ropes, tackles, &c. which may be necessary on the forecastle. It probably derives this name from its situation, as being neither on the starboard nor larboard side of the ship, nor on the waist or forecastle; but, being situated in the middle, partakes equally of all those places.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 206, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0896