PreviousNext
Page 845
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

M

MAGAZINE to MARLING-SPIKE
MAGAZINE
MAGNET
MAIN
MAKE
MALLET
MANGER
MARINE
MARLINE
MARLING
MARLING-SPIKE

MAROON to MAT

MATE of a ship of war to MIDSHIPMAN

MIZEN to MORTAR

MOULD to MUSTERING


Search

Contact us

MANGER

MANGER, (gatte, Fr.) a small apartment, extending athwart the lower-deck of a ship of war, immediately within the hawse-holes, and fenced on the after-part by a partition, which separates it from the other part of the deck behind it.

This partition serves as a fence to interrupt the passage of the water, which occasionally gushes in at the hawse-holes, or falls from the wet cable whilst it is heaved in by the capstern. The water, thus prevented from running aft, is immediately returned into the sea, by several small channels, called scuppers, cut through the ship's side within the manger.

The manger is therefore particularly useful in giving a contrary direction to the water that enters at the hawse-holes, which would otherwise run aft in great streams upon the lower deck, and render it extremely wet and uncomfortable, particularly in tempestuous weather, to the men who mess and sleep in different parts thereof.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 187, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0845