PreviousNext
Page 837
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

L

To LABOUR to LAND-FALL

LAND-LOCKED to LASHING

LATEEN-SAIL to LEE-SIDE

LEEWARD-SHIP to LIE ALONG

LIE TO to LIMBER-BOARDS

LIMBER-ROPE to LOG-BOOK

LONG-BOAT to LUFF

LUFF-TACKLE to LYING-TO in a storm
LUFF-TACKLE
LUG-SAIL
LYING-TO or LYING BY
LYING-TO in a storm


Search

Contact us

LYING-TO or LYING BY

LYING-TO, or LYING-BY, (enpanne, Fr.) the situation of a ship when she is retarded in her course, by arranging the sails in such a manner as to counteract each other with nearly an equal effort, and render the ship almost immoveable, with respect to her progressive motion, or head-way. A ship is usually brought-to by the main and fore-top-sails, one of which is laid aback, whilst the other is full; so that the latter pushes the ship forward, whilst the former resists this impulse, by forcing her astern. This is particularly practised in a general engagement, when the hostile fleets are drawn up in two lines of battle opposite each other. It is also used to wait for some other ship, either approaching or expected; or to avoid pursuing a dangerous course, especially in dark or foggy weather, &c.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 185, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0837