PreviousNext
Page 771
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

K

KAICLING or KECLING to KELSON

KETCH to KNOT
KETCH
KEVELS
KEY
KEYS
KINK
KNEE
KNEE of the head
KINGHT-HEAD or BOLLARD-TIMBER
KNIGHT-HEADS
KNITTLE
KNOT


Search

Contact us

KNIGHT-HEADS

KNIGHT-HEADS, two strong pieces of timber, fixed on the opposite sides of the main-deck, a little behind the fore-mast, in a merchant-ship. They are used to support and inclose the ends of the windlass, which accordingly is turned therein as upon an axis. As each of the knight-heads is formed of two pieces, they may be occasionally separated in order to take off the turns of the cable from the windlass, or replace them upon it. They are sometimes called the bits, and in this sense their upper parts only are denominated knight-heads, which being formerly embellished with a figure designed to resemble a human head, gave rise to the name they have ever since retained. See the article WINDLASS

KNIGHT-HEADS, (sep de drisse, Fr.) was also a name formerly given to the lower jear-blocks, which were then no other than bits, containing several sheaves, and nearly resembling our present top-sail-sheet bits.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 168, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0771