PreviousNext
Page 749
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

J

JACK to JIGGER

JIGGER TACKLE to JURY-MAST
JIGGER TACKLE
JOURNAL
JUNK
JURY-MAST


Search

Contact us

JOURNAL

JOURNAL, in navigation, a sort of diary, or daily register of the ship's course, winds, and weather; together with a general account of whatever is material to be remarked in the period of a sea voyage.

In all sea-journals, the day, or what is called the 24 hours, terminates at noon, because the errors of the dead-reckoning are at that period generally corrected by a solar observation. The daily compact usually contains the state of the weather, the variation, increase, or diminution of the wind and the suitable shifting, reducing, or enlarging the quantity of sail extended; as also the most material incidents of the voyage, and the condition of the ship and her crew; together with the discovery of other ships or fleets, land, shoals, breakers, foundings, &c.

The form of keeping journals is very different in merchant ships; but one method appears to be invariably pursued in the navy, which nevertheless is certainly capable of improvement, because no form can be properly called perfect, that leave as great a space for one day's work, the matter of which may be contained in very few lines, as for another that abounds with important incidents, so as to occupy ten times the space. If therefore there be any such thing as propriety of method on this occasion, it seems to imply, that the space containing should conform to the matter contained, which will necessarily be greater or less, according to circumstances.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 162, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0749