PreviousNext
Page 726
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

H

HAGS TEETH or HAKES TRETH to HANKS

HARBOUR to HAWSE

HAWSE-HOLES to HEAD-ROPE

HEAD-SAILS to HEAVING-out

HEAVING-short to HIGH AND DRY

HIGH WATER to Fore-HOLD

HOLD to HORSE

HOUNDS to HURRICANE
HOUNDS
HOUSED
HOWKER
HOUSING, or HOUSE-LINE
HOY
HULK
HULL
HULL a ship
HULL-to
HURRICANE


Search

Contact us

HULK

HULK, an old ship of war, fitted with an apparatus, to fix or take out the masts of his majesty's ships, as occasion requires.

The mast of this vessel a a fig. 2. plate V. is extremely high, and withal properly strengthened by shrouds and stays, in order to secure the sheers, (machine à mater, Fr.) which serve, as the arm of a crane, to hoist out or in the masts of any ship lying alongside. The sheers, b b, are composed of several long masts, whose heels rest upon the side of the hulk, and having their heads declining outward from the perpendicular, so as to hang over the vessel whose masts are to be fixed or displaced. The tackles, c c, which extend from the head of the mast to the sheer-heads, are intended to pull in the latter towards the mast-head, particularly when they are charged with the weight of a mast after it is raised out of any ship, which is performed by strong tackles depending from the sheer-heads. The effort of these tackles is produced by two capsterns, fixed on the deck for this purpose.

Plate 5

Plate V

HULK is also a name bestowed on any old vessel laid by, as unfit for further service: it is probably derived from the ολχασε&sigma or vessels of burthen of the ancient Grecians.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 158, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0726