PreviousNext
Page 675
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

H

HAGS TEETH or HAKES TRETH to HANKS

HARBOUR to HAWSE

HAWSE-HOLES to HEAD-ROPE
HAWSE-HOLES
HAWSE-PIECES
HAWSER
HEAD
HEAD of the Ship
By the HEAD
HEAD-FAST
HEAD-LAND
HEADMOST
HEAD-ROPE

HEAD-SAILS to HEAVING-out

HEAVING-short to HIGH AND DRY

HIGH WATER to Fore-HOLD

HOLD to HORSE

HOUNDS to HURRICANE


Search

Contact us

HEAD of the Ship

HEAD, (avant, Fr.) is also used, in a more enlarged sense, to signify the whole front or fore-part of the ship, including the bows on each side: the head therefore opens the column of water through which the ship- passes when advancing. Hence we say, head-sails, head-sea, head-way, &c.

Thus fig. 10. plate IV. represents one side of the fore-part, or head of a seventy-four gun ship, together with part of the bow, keel, and gunnel. The names of the several pieces, exhibited therein, are as follow:

Plate 4

Plate IV

A A Fore part of the keel, with a a the two false keels beneath it.

A C the stem.

a a The cat-head.

b b The supporter of the cat-head, (sous-barbe, Fr.)

c c The knight-head, or bollard-timber, of which there is one on each side, to secure the inner-end of the bowsprit.

d d The hawse-holes.

e e The navel-hoods, i.e. thick pieces of plank laid upon the bow to strengthen the edges of the hawse-holes.

f The davit-chock, by which the davit is firmly wedged while employed to fish the anchor.

g The bulk-head, which terminates the forecastle on the fore-side, being called the beak-head bulk-head by ship-wrights.

H The gun-ports of the lower deck.

h The gun-ports of the upper deck and forecastie.

I, I, The channels, with their dead-eyes and chain-plates.

i The gripe, or fore-foot, which unites the keel with the Item, forming a part of either.

k k These dotted lines represent the thickness and descent of the different decks from the fore-part of the ship towards the middle. The lowest of the three dotted lines l expresses the convexity of the beams, or the difference between the heighth of the deck in the middle of it's breadth, and at the ship's side. This is also exhibited more clearly in the midship-frame, where the real curve of the beam is delineated.

N. B. These lines must be always parallel to the lines which terminate the gun-ports above and below.

m m The timbers of the head, and part of the bowsprit.

X The rails of the head which lie across the timbers.

Q Z Fore-part of the main-wale.

R X Fore-part of the channel-wale.

U C The load water-line.

See also the continuation of a ship throughout her whole length, upon a smaller scale, plate I. ELEVATION.

Plate 1

Plate I

Fig. ii. represents a head-view of a ship, with the projection of her principal timbers, and all her planks laid on one side. This figure corresponds to that of the elevation, plate I. and the stem-view, fig. 2. plate X.

Plate 10

Plate X

It is evident that the fore-part of a ship is called it's head, from the affinity of motion and position it bears to a fish, and in general to the horizontal situation of all animals whilst swimming.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 147, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0675