PreviousNext
Page 670
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

H

HAGS TEETH or HAKES TRETH to HANKS

HARBOUR to HAWSE
HARBOUR
HARD-A-LEE
HARD-A-WEATHER
HARPINS
Cat-HARPINS
HARPOON
HATCH or HATCHWAY
To HAUL
To HAUL the wind
HAWSE

HAWSE-HOLES to HEAD-ROPE

HEAD-SAILS to HEAVING-out

HEAVING-short to HIGH AND DRY

HIGH WATER to Fore-HOLD

HOLD to HORSE

HOUNDS to HURRICANE


Search

Contact us

HAWSE

HAWSE, is generally understood to imply the situation of the cables before the ship's stem, when she is moored with two anchors out from forward, viz. one on the starboard, and the other on the larboard bow. Hence it is usual to say, she has a clear hawse, or a foul hawse. It also denotes any small distance a-head of a ship, or between her head and the anchors employed to ride her; as, "He has anchored in our hawse; the brig fell athwart our hawse," &c.

A ship is said to ride with a clear hawse, when the cables are directed to their anchors, without lying athwart the stem; or crossing, or being twisted round each other, by the ship's winding about, according to the change of the wind, tide, or current.

A foul hawse, on the contrary, implies that the cables lie across the stem, or bear upon each other, so as to be rubbed and chafed by the motion of the vessel.

The hawse accordingly is foul, by having either a cross, an elbow, or a round turn. If the larboard cable, lying across the stem, points out on the starboard side, while the starboard cable at the same time grows out on the larboard side, there is a cross in the hawse. If, after this, the ship, without returning to her former position, continues to wind about the same way, so as to perform an entire revolution, each of the cables will be twisted round the other, and then directed out from the opposite bow, forming what is called a round turn. An elbow is produced when the ship stops in the middle of that revolution, after having had a cross: or, in other words, if the rides with her head northward with a clear hawse, and afterwards turns quite round so as to direct her head northward again, the will have an elbow. See the articles ELBOW and RIDING.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 145, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0670