PreviousNext
Page 662
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

H

HAGS TEETH or HAKES TRETH to HANKS

HARBOUR to HAWSE
HARBOUR
HARD-A-LEE
HARD-A-WEATHER
HARPINS
Cat-HARPINS
HARPOON
HATCH or HATCHWAY
To HAUL
To HAUL the wind
HAWSE

HAWSE-HOLES to HEAD-ROPE

HEAD-SAILS to HEAVING-out

HEAVING-short to HIGH AND DRY

HIGH WATER to Fore-HOLD

HOLD to HORSE

HOUNDS to HURRICANE


Search

Contact us

HARD-A-LEE

HARD-A-LEE, (barre à bord, sous le vent, Fr.) the situation of the helm when it is pushed close to the lee side of the ship, either to tack or keep her head to the wind, when lying by or trying: also the order to put the helm in this position.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 144, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0662