PreviousNext
Page 602
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

G

GAFF to GANG
GAFF
GAGE
To GAIN the wind
GALE of wind
GALEON
GALLED
GALLERY
GALLEY
GAMMONING
GANG

GANG-BOARD to GIMBALS

GIMBLETING to Fire-GRAPPLING

GRATINGS to GROUND-TACKLE

GROWING to GUTTER-LEDGE

GUY to GYBING


Search

Contact us

GALEON

GALEON, a name formerly given to ships of war, furnished with three or four batteries of cannon. It is now retained only by the Spaniards, and applied to the largest size of their merchant ships, employed on West-Indian voyages, and usually furnished with four decks. They likewise bestow the same name on those vessels, whether great or small, which proceed annually to La Vera Cruz. The Portugueze also have several ships which they send to India and the Brazils, nearly resembling the galeons, and by them called caragues.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 136, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0602