PreviousNext
Page 591
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

F

FACTOR to To FALL a-stern

To FALL calm to FETCHING the pump

FID to FIRE-SHIP

FISH to To FLAT-IN

To FLAT-IN FORWARD to FLUSH

FLY of an ensign to FORE-CASTLE

FORE-CAT-HARPINS to FORE-STAY

FORE-TOP to FOTHERING

FOUL to FRESH

To FRESHEN the bawse to FUTTOCK-SHROUDS
To FRESHEN the bawse
FRESHES
FRIGATE
FRIGATE-BUILT
FULL AND BY
FURLING
FURLING-LINE
FUTTOCKS
FUTTOCK-SHROUDS


Search

Contact us

FRIGATE-BUILT

FRIGATE-BUILT, (fregaté, Fr.) implies the disposition of the decks of such merchant-ships as have a descent of four or five steps from the quarter-deck and fore-castle into the waist, in contra-distinction to those whose decks are on a continued line for the whole length of the Ship, which are called galley-built. See the article FLUSH.

Formerly the name of frigate was only known in the Mediterranean, and applied to a kind of long vessel, navigated in that sea with sails and oars. The English were the first who appeared on the ocean with those ships, and equipped them for war as well as commerce.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 134, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0591