PreviousNext
Page 454
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

D

DAM to DEAD-WORK

DECKS to DEPTH of a sail

DETACHMENT of a fleet or squadro to DOCK-YARDS

DOG to DOWN-HAUL-TACKLE

To DOWSE to DRIVING
To DOWSE
DRABLER
DRAG
DRAGGING the anchor
DRAUGHT
DRAWING
DRESSING
DRIFT
DRIVER
DRIVING

DROP to DUNNAGE


Search

Contact us

DRIFT

DRIFT, (derive, Fr. from drive) in navigation, the angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the nearest meridian, when she drives with her side to the wind and waves, and is not governed by the power of the helm: it also implies the distance which the ship drives on that line.

A ship's way is only called drift in a storm; and then, when it blows so vehemently, as to prevent her from carrying any sail, or at least restrains her to such a portion of sail as may be necessary to keep her sufficiently inclined to one side, that she may not be dismasted by her violent labouring, produced by the turbulence of the sea.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 102, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0454