PreviousNext
Page 437
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

D

DAM to DEAD-WORK

DECKS to DEPTH of a sail

DETACHMENT of a fleet or squadro to DOCK-YARDS

DOG to DOWN-HAUL-TACKLE
DOG
DOGGER
DOLPHIN of the mast
DOUBLE-BANKED
DOUBLING
DOUBLING-NAILS
DOUBLING-UPON
DOWN
DOWN-HAUL
DOWN-HAUL-TACKLE

To DOWSE to DRIVING

DROP to DUNNAGE


Search

Contact us
DOG to DOWN-HAUL-TACKLE

DOG

DOG, a sort of iron hook, or bar, with a sharp fang at one end, so formed as to be easily driven into a plank: it is used to drag along the planks of oak when they are let into a hole under the stern of a ship, to be stowed in the hold. For this purpose there is a rope fastened to the end of the dog, upon which several men pull, to draw the plank towards the place where it is to be stowed. It is also used for the same purpose in unlading the ship.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 101, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0437