PreviousNext
Page 402
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER
CROWNING
CRUISE
CUDDY
CUNNING
CURRENT
CUTTER
CUTTING-DOWN LINE
CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CURRENT (continued)

If a current sets directly against the ship's course, then her motion is retarded in proportion to the strength of the current. Hence it is plain, 1. If the velocity of the current be less than that of the ship, then the ship will advance so much as is the difference of these velocities. 2. If the velocity of the current be more than that of the ship, then will the ship fall as much astern as is the difference of these velocities. 3. If the velocity of the current be equal to that of the ship, then will the ship stand still, the one velocity destroying the other.

If the current thwarts the course of a ship, it not only diminishes or increases her velocity, but gives her a new direction, compounded of the course the steers, and the setting of the current, as appears by the following

LEMMA.

[diagram here]

If a body at A be impelled by two forces at the same time, the one in the direction A B, carrying it from A to B in a certain space of time, and the other in the direction A D, pushing it from A to D in the same time; complete the parallelogram A B C D, and

draw the diagonal A C: then the body at A, (which let us suppose a ship agitated by the wind and current; A B being the line along which she advances as impressed by the wind, and A D the line upon which she is driven by the current) will move along the diagonal A C, and will be in the point C, at the end of the time in which it would have moved along A D or A B, as impelled by either of those forces, (the wind or current) separately.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 93, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0402