PreviousNext
Page 381
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL
COUNTER
COUNTER-BRACING
COURSE
Oblique COURSE
COURSES
CRAB
CRADLE
CRAFT
CRANK
CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CRAB

CRAB, a sort of wooden pillar, whose lower end, being let down through a ship's decks, rests upon a socket like the capstern; and having in it's upper-end three or four holes, at different heighths; thro' the middle of it, above one another, into which long bars are thrust, whose length is nearly equal to the breadth of the deck. It is employed to wind in the cable, or to purchase any other weighty matter which requires a great mechanical power. This differs from a capstern, as not being furnished with a drum-head, and by having the bars to go intirely through it, reaching from one side of the deck to the other; whereas those of the capstern, which are superior in number, reach only about eight inches or a foot into the drum-head, according to the size thereof. This machine is represented in plate II. by fig. 10. and 13. See also CAPSTERN.

Plate 2

Plate II


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 89, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0381