PreviousNext
Page 353
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS
COAT
COBBING
COBBING-BOARD
COBOOSE
COCK-PIT of a ship of war
COCKSWAIN, or COXEN
COD-FISHER
COIL and COILING
COLLAR
COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

COIL and COILING

COIL, (cueillir, Fr.) the manner in which all ropes are disposed aboard ships for the conveniency of stowage; because

COILING, (rouer, Fr.) implies a sort of serpentine winding of a cable or other rope, that it may occupy a small space in the ship. Each of the windings of this sort is called a fake, and one range of fakes upon the same line is called a tier; there are generally from five to seven fakes in a tier, and three or four tiers in the whole length of the cables. This, however, depends on the extent of the fakes. The smaller ropes employed about the sails are coiled upon cleats at sea, to prevent their being entangled amongst one another in traversing, contracting, or extending the sails.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 84, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0353