PreviousNext
Page 337
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT
CLINCHER-WORK
CLOSE-HAULED
CLOSE-QUARTERS
CLUE of a sail
CLUE-GARNETS
CLUE-LINES
COACH, or COUCH
COAMINGS of the hatches
COASTING
COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CLOSE-HAULED

CLOSE-HAULED, (au plus pres, Fr.) in navigation, the general arrangement, or trim, of a ship's sails, when the endeavours to make a progress in the nearest direction possible towards that point of the compass from which the wind bloweth.

In this manner of sailing the keel commonly makes an angle of fix points with the line of the wind; but sloops, and some other small vessels, are said to sail almost a point nearer. All vessels, however, are supposed to make nearly a point of lee-way, when close-hauled, even when they have the advantage of a good sailing-breeze and smooth water. The angle of lee-way, however, enlarges in proportion to the increase of the wind and sea.

In this disposition of the sails, they are all extended sideways on the ship, so that the wind, as it crosses the ship obliquely towards the stern from forwards, may fill their cavities. But as the current of wind also enters the cavities of the sails, in an oblique direction, the effort of it, to make the the ship advance, is considerably diminished: she will, therefore, make the least progress when sailing in this manner.

The ship is said to be close-hauled, because at this time her tacks, or lower corners of the principal sails, are drawn close down to her side to windward; the sheets hauled close aft; and all the bow-lines drawn to their greatest extension, in order to keep the sails steady.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 82, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0337