PreviousNext
Page 301
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW
CARTEL
CARTRIDGE
CARTRIDGE-BOX
CAST AWAY
CASTING
CAT
CATAMARAN
CAT-HARPINS
CAT-HEADS
CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CAT

CAT, (chatte, Fr.) a ship employed in the coal trade, formed from the Norwegian model. It is distinguished by a narrow stern, projecting quarters, a deep waist, and by having no ornamental figure on the prow.

These vessels are generally built remarkably strong, and carry from four to six hundred tons; or, in the language of their own mariners, from twenty to thirty keels of coals.

CAT, (capon, Fr.) is also a sort of strong tackle, or complication of pullies, to hook and draw the anchor perpendicularly up to the cat-head. The use of this machine is represented in plate II. fig. 14.

Plate 2

Plate II


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 79, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0301