PreviousNext
Page 292
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship
Surge the CAPSTERN
To heave the CAPSTERN
To come up the CAPSTERN
To pawl the CAPSTERN
CAPTAIN of a ship of war
CAREENING
CARGO
CARLINGS
CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CAREENING

CAREENING, (faire abattre, cariner, Fr.) the operation of heaving the ship down on one side, by the application of a strong purchase to her masts, which are properly supported for the occasion, to prevent them from breaking with so great a strain.

Careening is used to heave one of the ship's sides so low in the water, as that her bottom, being elevated above it's surface on the other side, (See plate I. fig. 5.) may be cleansed from any filth, which adheres to it, by BREAMING; which see.

Plate 1

Plate I

When a ship is laid on a careen, every thing is taken out of her: she is also said to careen when inclining to one side at sea, as pressed with a weight of sail.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 78, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0292