PreviousNext
Page 290
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship
Surge the CAPSTERN
To heave the CAPSTERN
To come up the CAPSTERN
To pawl the CAPSTERN
CAPTAIN of a ship of war
CAREENING
CARGO
CARLINGS
CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

CAPTAIN of a ship of war

CAPTAIN of a ship of war, (capitaine du haut bord, Fr.) the officer who commands a ship of the line of battle, or a frigate carrying twenty or more cannon. The charge of a captain in his Majesty's navy is very comprehensive, inasmuch as he is not only answerable for any bad conduct in the military government, navigation, and equipment of the ship he commands; but also for any neglect of duty, or ill management in his inferior officers, whose several charges he is appointed to superintend and regulate.

On his first receiving information of the condition and quality of the ship he is appointed to command, he must attend her constantly, and hasten the necessary preparations to fit her for sea. So strict indeed are the injunctions laid on him by the lord high admiral, or commissioners of the admiralty, that he is forbid to lie out of his ship, from his arrival on board, till the day of his discharge, unless by particular leave from the admiralty, or his commander in chief.

He is enjoined to shew a laudable example of honour and virtue to the officers and men, and to discountenance all dissolute, immoral, and disorderly practices, and such as are contrary to the rules of discipline and subordination, as well as to correct those who are guilty of such offences, as are punishable according to the usage of the sea.

He is ordered particularly to survey all the military stores which are fent on board, and to return whatsoever is deemed unfit for service. His diligence and application are required to procure his complement of men; observing carefully to enter only such as are fit for the necessary duty, that the government may not be put to improper expence. When his ship is fully manned, he is expected to keep the established number of men complete, and superintend the muster himfelf, if there is no clerk of the check at the port.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 76, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0290