PreviousNext
Page 255
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

C

CABIN to To CALK, or CAULK
CABIN
CABLE
Stream-CABLE
To bit the CABLE
To serve the CABLE
Heave in the CABLE!
Pay away the CABLE!
CABLES length
To CALK, or CAULK

CALL to CANNON

CANNON to CANOE

CANOE to To rig the CAPSTERN

Surge the CAPSTERN to CARPENTER of a ship

CARTEL to CATS-PAW

CAULKING to CHANNEL

CHANNELS to CHEARLY

CHEEKS of the mast to CLINCH

CLINCHER-WORK to COASTING-PILOT

COAT to COLLIERS

COLOURS to COMPASS

COMPASSING to COVE

COUNTER to CRAWL

CREEPER to CROW-FOOT

CROWNING to CUT-WATER


Search

Contact us

To CALK, or CAULK

To CALK, or CAULK, (calfater, probably from calage, Fr. hemp) to drive a quantity of oakum, or old ropes untwisted and drawn asunder, into the seams of the planks, or into the intervals where the planks are joined to each other in the ship's decks or sides, in order to prevent the entrance of water. After the oakum is driven very hard into these seams, it is covered with hot melted pitch or resin, to keep the water from rotting it.

Amongst the ancients, the first who made use of pitch in calking, were the inhabitants of Phaeacia, afterwards called Corsica. Wax and resin appear to have been commonly used previous to that period; and the Poles at this time use a sort of unctuous clay for the same purpose, on their navigable rivers.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 60, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0255