PreviousNext
Page 213
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

B

BACK of the post to BALANCE of the mizen

BALANCE of the boom sail to BARK

BARNACLE to BEAMS

BEAMS to BED of a river

BED of a cannon to BIGHT

BILANDER to BLACK-STRAKES

BLADE to Trim the BOAT!

To bale the BOAT to BOLT-ROPE

BOMB to BOTTOM

BOTTOM to BOX-HAULING

BOXING to To BREAK-UP

BREAK-WATER to BRIDLES of the bowline
BREAK-WATER
To BREAM
BREAST-FAST
BREAST-HOOKS
BREAST-WORK
BREECHING
BREEZE
BREWING
BRIDLES
BRIDLES of the bowline

BRIG, or BRIGANTINE to Ship-BUILDING

Ship-BUILDING to BUNTINE

BUNTLINES to BUTTONS


Search

Contact us

BRIDLES of the bowline

BRIDLES of the bowline, (pattes, Fr.) the legs by which the bowline is fastened to different places on the edge or skirt of a large sail.

We have already explained the use of the bowline; that it is employed to confine or keep steady the windward or weather edges of the principal sails when they are braced for a side-wind. For as the current of air enters the cavity of the sail in a direction nearly parallel to it's surface, it follows that the ridge of the sail must necessarily be shaken by the wind, unless it is kept tight forward; but as a single rope has not been found sufficient to confine the whole skirt of the sail, inasmuch as it only draws upon one part thereof, it became necessary to apply bridles or legs spreading out from the bowline. They are represented in the figures annexed to the article SAIL.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 50, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0213