PreviousNext
Page 205
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

B

BACK of the post to BALANCE of the mizen

BALANCE of the boom sail to BARK

BARNACLE to BEAMS

BEAMS to BED of a river

BED of a cannon to BIGHT

BILANDER to BLACK-STRAKES

BLADE to Trim the BOAT!

To bale the BOAT to BOLT-ROPE

BOMB to BOTTOM

BOTTOM to BOX-HAULING

BOXING to To BREAK-UP

BREAK-WATER to BRIDLES of the bowline
BREAK-WATER
To BREAM
BREAST-FAST
BREAST-HOOKS
BREAST-WORK
BREECHING
BREEZE
BREWING
BRIDLES
BRIDLES of the bowline

BRIG, or BRIGANTINE to Ship-BUILDING

Ship-BUILDING to BUNTINE

BUNTLINES to BUTTONS


Search

Contact us

To BREAM

To BREAM, (chauffer, Fr. from broom) to burn off the filth, such as grass, ooze, shells, or sea-weed, from a ship's bottom, that has gathered to it in a voyage, or by lying long in a harbour. This operation is performed by holding kindled furze, faggots, or such materials, to the bottom, so that the flame incorporating with the pitch, sulphur, &c. that had formerly covered it, immediately loosens and throws off whatever filth may have adhered to the planks. After this, the bottom is covered anew with a composition of sulphur, tallow, &c. which not only makes it smooth and slippery, so as to divide the fluid more readily, but also poisons and destroys those worms which eat through the planks in the course of a voyage. Breaming may be performed either when the ship lies aground after the tide has ebbed from her, or by docking, or by careening, which see; as also COAT and STUFF.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 48, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0205