PreviousNext
Page 193
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

B

BACK of the post to BALANCE of the mizen

BALANCE of the boom sail to BARK

BARNACLE to BEAMS

BEAMS to BED of a river

BED of a cannon to BIGHT

BILANDER to BLACK-STRAKES

BLADE to Trim the BOAT!

To bale the BOAT to BOLT-ROPE

BOMB to BOTTOM

BOTTOM to BOX-HAULING
BOTTOM
BOTTOMRY
BOW
BOWER
BOWLINE
To check the BOWLINE
To BOWSE
BOWSPRIT
BOXES of the pump
BOX-HAULING

BOXING to To BREAK-UP

BREAK-WATER to BRIDLES of the bowline

BRIG, or BRIGANTINE to Ship-BUILDING

Ship-BUILDING to BUNTINE

BUNTLINES to BUTTONS


Search

Contact us

BOX-HAULING

BOX-HAULING, in navigation, a particular method of veering a ship, when the swell of the sea renders tacking impracticable. It is performed by putting the helm a-lee, to throw the head tip to windward, where meeting with great resistance from the repeated shocks of the waves on the weather bow, it falls off, or turns to leeward, with a quicker effort, and without advancing. The aftermost sails are at this time diminished, or perhaps altogether deprived of their force of action, for a short time, because they would otherwise counteract the sails forward, and prevent the ship from turning. They are, however, extended as soon as the ship, in veering, brings the wind on the opposite quarter, as their effort then contributes to assist her motion of wheeling.

BOX-HAULING is generally performed when the ship is too near the shore to have room for veering in the usual way. See VEERING.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 46, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0193