PreviousNext
Page 166
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

B

BACK of the post to BALANCE of the mizen

BALANCE of the boom sail to BARK

BARNACLE to BEAMS

BEAMS to BED of a river

BED of a cannon to BIGHT

BILANDER to BLACK-STRAKES

BLADE to Trim the BOAT!

To bale the BOAT to BOLT-ROPE
To bale the BOAT
Moor the BOAT!
BOATS OF A SHIP OF WAR
BOAT-HOOK
BOATSWAIN
BOB-STAY
BOLD
BOLSTERS
BOLT
BOLT-ROPE

BOMB to BOTTOM

BOTTOM to BOX-HAULING

BOXING to To BREAK-UP

BREAK-WATER to BRIDLES of the bowline

BRIG, or BRIGANTINE to Ship-BUILDING

Ship-BUILDING to BUNTINE

BUNTLINES to BUTTONS


Search

Contact us

BOATS OF A SHIP OF WAR

BOATS OF A SHIP OF WAR

For a representation of some of the principal boats of a ship of war, see plate III. where fig. I. exhibits the elevation, or side view, of a ten-oared barge; a a, it's keel; b, the stern-post, c, the stem; b c, the water-line, which separates what is under the surface of the water from what is above it; e, the row-locks, which contain the oars between them; f, the top of the stern; g, the back-board; f g, the place where the cockswain stands or sits while steering the boat; 1, the rudder, and m, the tiller, which is framed of iron.

Plate 3

Plate III

Fig. 2. represents the plan of the same barge, where d is the 'thwarts, or seats where the rowers sit to manage their oars; f, i, h, the stern-sheets; i k, the benches whereon the passengers fit in the stern-sheets : the rest is explained in fig. I.

Fig. 3. is a stern view of the same barge, with the projection of all the timbers in the after-body; and fig. 4. a head view, with the curves of all the timbers in the fore-body.

Having thus explained the different views of the barge, the reader will easily comprehend the several corresponding parts in the other boats; where fig. 5 is the plan, and fig. 6 the elevation of a twelve-oared cutter that rows double banked: which, although seldom employed unless in capital ships, because requiring twelve rowers, is nevertheless a very excellent boat, both for rowing and sailing. Fig. 7 and 8 are the head and stern of this boat.

Fig. 9 is the plan of a long-boat, of which fig. 10 is the elevation, 11 the stern-view, and 1 12 the head-view.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 40, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0166