PreviousNext
Page 63
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

A

ABACK to ADMIRAL of the fleet

Vice-ADMIRAL to AFTER-SAILS

AGENT-VICTUALLER to ALL'S WELL

ALL bands high to ANCHOR

To drag the ANCHORS to To fish the ANCHOR

To sheer the ship to her ANCHOR to Top-ARMOUR
To sheer the ship to her ANCHOR
To shoe the ANCHOR
To weigh the ANCHOR
ANCHOR-ground
AN-END
APEEK
APRON
Naval ARCHITECTURE
ARMED-SHIP
Top-ARMOUR

ASHORE to AUGER

AWEIGH to AZIMUTH COMPASS


Search

Contact us

Naval ARCHITECTURE

Naval ARCHITECTURE, or the science of ship-building, comprehends the theory of delineating marine vessels upon a plane; and the art of framing them upon the stocks, according to the proportions exhibited in a regular design.

All edifices, whether civil, or military, are known to be erected in consequence of certain established plans, which have been previously altered or improved till they have arrived at the desired point of persection. The construction of ships appears also to require at least as much correctness and precision as the buildings which are founded upon terra firma: it is there.. fore absolutely necessary that the mechanical skill of the shipwright should be assisted by plans and sections, which have been drawn with all possible exactness, examined by proper calculations, and submitted to the most accurate scrutiny.

Naval ARCHITECTURE, or ship-building, may be distinguished into three principal parts.

First, To give the ship such an exterior form as may be most suitable to the service for which she is designed.

Secondly, To give the various pieces of a ship their proper figures; to assemble and unite them into a firm, compact frame, so that by their combination and disposition they may form a solid fabric, sufficient to answer all the purposes for which it is intended. And,

Thirdly, To provide convenient accommodations for the officers and crew, as well as suitable apartments for the cargo, furniture, provisions, artillery and ammunition.

The exterior figure of a ship may be divided into the bottom and upper-works.

The bottom, or quick-work, contains what is termed the hold, and which is under water when the ship is laden. The upper-works, called also the dead-work, comprehend all that part which is usually above the water when the ship is laden.

The figure of the bottom is therefore determined by the qualities which are necessary for the vessel, and conformable to the service for which she is proposed.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 11, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0063