PreviousNext
Page 42
Previous/Next Page
William Falconer's Dictionary of the MarineReference Works
----------
Table of Contents

A

ABACK to ADMIRAL of the fleet

Vice-ADMIRAL to AFTER-SAILS

AGENT-VICTUALLER to ALL'S WELL

ALL bands high to ANCHOR
ALL bands high
ALOST
ALONG-side
To lay ALONG-side
ALONG-shore
Lying ALONG
ALOOF
AMAIN
AMIDSHIPS
ANCHOR

To drag the ANCHORS to To fish the ANCHOR

To sheer the ship to her ANCHOR to Top-ARMOUR

ASHORE to AUGER

AWEIGH to AZIMUTH COMPASS


Search

Contact us

ALOOF

ALOOF (lof, Fr.) this has frequently been mentioned as a sea-term, but whether justly or not we shall not presume to determine; it is known in common discourse to imply at a distance; and the resemblance of the phrases, keep aloof, and keep a luff, or keep the luff, in all probability gave rise to this conjecture. If it was really a sea-phrase originally, it seems to have referred to the dangers of a lee-shore, in which situation the pilot might naturally apply it in the sense commonly understood, viz. keep all off, or quite off; it is, however, never expressed in that manner by seamen now. See LUFF. It may not be improper to observe, that, besides using this phrase in the same sense with us, the French also call the weather side of a ship, and the weather clue of a course, le lof.


Previous Page Reference Works Next Page


© Derived from Thomas Cadell's new corrected edition, London: 1780, page 7, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-refs-falc-0042