PreviousNext
Page 510
Previous/Next Page
Voyages in the Southern Hemisphere, Vols. II - IIIVoyaging Accounts
----------
Table of Contents

On this day ...
12 - 14 May 1770

Endeavour Voyage Maps
James Cook
Joseph Banks
Parkinson


Range from Botany Bay to Trinity Bay


Index
Search

Contact us
Range from Botany Bay to Trinity Bay (continued)

At day-break, we steered north, for the northermost land in sight. At noon, we were four leagues from the shore, and by observation, in latitude 31° 18’ S., which was fifteen miles to the southward of that given by the log; our longitude 206° 58’ W. In the afternoon, we stood in for the land, where we saw smoke in several places, till six in the evening, when, being within three or four miles of it, and in twenty-four fathom of water, we stood off with a fresh breeze at N. and N.N.W. till midnight, when we had 118 fathom, at the distance of eight leagues from the land, and then tacked. At three in the morning, the wind veered to the westward, when we tacked and stood to the northward. At noon, our latitude, by observation, was 30° 43’ S., and our longitude 206° 45’ W. At this time we were between three and four leagues from the shore, the northermost part of which bore from us N. 13 W. and a point, or head land, on which we saw fires that produced a great quantity of smoke, bore W. distant four leagues. To this Point I gave the name of SMOKEY CAPE: it is of a condsierable height, and over the pitch of the Point is a round hillock; within it are two others, much higher and larger, and within them the land is very low. Our latitude was 30° 31’ S., longitude 206° 54’ W.: this day the observed latitude was only five miles south of the log. We saw smoke in several parts along the coast, besides that seen upon Smokey Cape.

In the afternoon, the wind being at N.E. we stood off and on, and at three or four miles distance from the shore had thirty fathom water: the wind afterwards coming cross off land, we stood to the northward, having from thirty to twenty-one fathom, at the distance of four or five miles from the shore.

At five in the morning, the wind veered to the north, and blew fresh, attended with squalls: at eight, it began to thunder and rain, and in about an hour it fell calm, which gave us an opportunity to sound, and we had eighty-six fathom at between four and five leagues from the shore: soon after this we had a gale from the southward, with which we steered N. by W. for the northermost land in sight. At noon, we were about four leagues from the shore, and by observation, in latitude 30° 22’, which was nine miles to the southward of our reckoning, longitude 206° 39’ W. Some lands near the shore, of a considerable height, bore W.


Previous Page Voyaging Accounts Next Page


© Derived from Vols. II-III of the London 1773 edition: National Library of Australia call no. FERG 7243, pages 510 - 511, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-hv23-510