PreviousNext
Page 427
Previous/Next Page
Voyages in the Southern Hemisphere, Vols. II - IIIVoyaging Accounts
----------
Table of Contents

On this day ...
16 - 21 March 1770

Endeavour Voyage Maps
James Cook
Joseph Banks
Parkinson


Range from Cape Turnagain to Western Entrance of Cook's Streight


Index
Search

Contact us
Range from Cape Turnagain to Western Entrance of Cook's Streight (continued)

At seven in the evening, we brought to, in thirty-three fathom with a fine sandy bottom, at ten we had fifty fathom, and at twelve wore in sixty-five fathom, having driven several miles N.N.W. after our having brought to. At two in the morning, we had no ground with 140 fathom, by which it appears that the soundings extend but a little way from the shore. About this time it fell calm; at eight, a breeze sprung up at S.W. with which we steered along the shore, in the direction of N.E. by E. ½ E. at the distance of about three leagues. At six in the evening, being about one league from the shore, we had seventeen fathom; and at eight, being about three leagues from the shore, we had forty-four: we now shortened sail and brought to, having run ten leagues N.E. by E. since noon.

It was calm most part of the night; but at ten in the morning a light breeze sprung up at S.W. by W. when we made sail again along the shore, N.E. by N. having a large swell from the W.S.W. which had risen in the night; at noon, our latitude, by observation, was 43° 4’ S. and our longitude from Cape West 4° 12’ E. We observed, that the vallies as well as the mountains were this morning covered with snow, part of which we supposed to have fallen during the night, when we had rain. At six in the evening we shortened sail, and at ten brought to, at the distance of about five leagues from the shore, where we had 115 fathom. At midnight, there being little wind, we made sail, and at eight in the morning we stood to the N.E. close upon a wind till noon, when we tacked, being about three leagues from the land, and, by observation, in latitude 42° 8’, and longitude from Cape West 5° 5’ E.

We continued to stand westward till two in the morning, when we made a trip to the eastward, and afterwards stood westward till noon, when, by our reckoning, we were in the latitude of 42° 23’, and longitude from Cape West 3° 55’ E. We now tacked and stood eastward, with a fresh gale at N. by W. till six in the evening, when the wind shifted to the S. and S.S.W. with which we steered N.E. by N. till six in the morning, when we hauled in E. by N. to make the land, which we saw soon afterwards; at noon, our latitude, by account, was 41° 37’, and our longitude from Cape West 5° 42’ E. We were now within three or four leagues of the land, but it being foggy, we could see nothing upon it distinctly, and as we had much wind, and a vast swell rolling in upon the shore, from the W.S.W. I did not think it safe to go nearer.


Previous Page Voyaging Accounts Next Page


© Derived from Vols. II-III of the London 1773 edition: National Library of Australia call no. FERG 7243, pages 427 - 428, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-hv23-427