PreviousNext
Page 297
Previous/Next Page
Voyages in the Southern Hemisphere, Vols. II - IIIVoyaging Accounts
----------
Table of Contents

On this day ...
11 October 1769

Endeavour Voyage Maps
James Cook
Joseph Banks
Parkinson


Description of Poverty Bay


Index
Search

Contact us
Description of Poverty Bay (continued)

The south west point of the bay I named YOUNG NICK’S HEAD, after Nicholas Young, the boy who first saw the land; at noon, it bare N.W. by W. distant about three or four leagues, and we were then about three miles from the shore. The main land extended from N.E. by N. to south, and I proposed to follow the direction of the coast to the southward as far as the latitude of 40 or 41; and then, if I met with no encouragement to proceed farther, to return to the northward.

In the afternoon we lay becalmed, which the people on shore perceiving, several canoes put off, and came within less than a quarter of a mile of the vessel; but could not be persuaded to come nearer, though Tupia exerted all the powers of his lungs and his eloquence upon the occasion, shouting, and promising that they should not be hurt. Another canoe was now seen coming from Poverty Bay, with only four people on board, one of whom we well remembered to have seen in our first interview upon the rock. This canoe, without stopping or taking the least notice of the others, came directly alongside of the ship, and with very little persuasion, we got the Indians on board. Their example was soon followed by the rest, and we had about us seven canoes, and about fifty men. We made them all presents with a liberal hand; notwithstanding which, they were so desirous to have more of our commodities, that they sold us every thing they had, even the clothes from their backs, and the paddles from their boats. There were but two weapons among them, these were the instruments of green talc, which were shaped somewhat like a pointed battledore, with a short handle and sharp edges; they were called Patoo-Patoo, and were well contrived for close-fighting, as they would certainly split the thickest scull at a single blow.


Previous Page Voyaging Accounts Next Page


© Derived from Vols. II-III of the London 1773 edition: National Library of Australia call no. FERG 7243, pages 297 - 298, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-hv23-297