PreviousNext
Page 165
Previous/Next Page
Voyages in the Southern Hemisphere, Vol. IVoyaging Accounts
----------
Table of Contents

Tinian to Pulo Timoan and thence Batavia


Index
Search

Contact us
Tinian to Pulo Timoan and thence Batavia (continued)

Point, on the Sumatra shore, S.W. to avoid a shoal, called Frederick Hendrick, which is about mid-way between the Banca and Sumatra shore: the soundings were thirteen and fourteen fathom. We then steered E.S.E. and kept mid-channel to avoid the banks of Palambam River, and that which lies off the westermost point of Banca. When we were abreast of Palambam River, we regularly shoaled our water from fourteen to seven fathom; and when we had passed it, we deepened it again to fifteen and sixteen fathom. We continued to steer E.S.E. between the Third and Fourth Points of Sumatra, which are about ten leagues distant from each other: the soundings, nearest to the Sumatra shore, were all along from eleven to thirteen fathom; and the high land of Queda Banca appeared over the Third Point of Sumatra, bearing E.S.E. From the Third Point to the Second, the course is S.E. by S. at the distance of about eleven or twelve leagues. The high land of Queda Banca, and the Second Point of Sumatra bear E.N.E. and W.S.W. of each other. The Streight is about five leagues over, and in the mid-channel there is twenty-four fathom. At six o’clock in the evening, we anchored in thirteen fathom; Monopin Hill bearing N. ½ W.; and the Third Point of Sumatra, S.E. by E. distant between two and three leagues. Many small vessels were in sight, and most of them hoisted Dutch colours. In the night we had fresh gales and squalls, with thunder and lightning, and hard rain; but, as our cables were good, we were in no danger, for in this place the anchor is buried in a stiff clay.

In the morning the current or tide set to the S.E. at the rate of three knots; at five we weighed, with a moderate gale at west and hazey weather, and in the night the tide shifted, and ran as strongly to the N.W.; so that it ebbs and flows here twelve hours.


Previous Page Voyaging Accounts Next Page


© Derived from Volume I of the London 1773 Edition: National Library of Australia call no. FERG 7243, page 129, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-hv01-165