PreviousNext
16 September 1770
Previous/Next Page
Cook's Journal: Daily EntriesVoyaging Accounts
----------
Table of Contents

On this day ...
16 September 1770

Endeavour Voyage Maps
Joseph Banks
Parkinson
Hawkesworth


1770

Index
Search

Contact us

Search for
in Falconer's Dictionary of the Marine
16 September 1770

Sunday 16th Light breezes from the NEBE with Clear weather, except in the Morning when we had it clowdy with a few small showers of Rain. Steerd along shore SW and SWBW untill 6 oClock in the Morning when we Steerd WSW and at 9 oClock west at which time we saw the Island Rotte right ahead At Noon we were in the Latitude of 10°..39' St Longde 235°.57' the South end of Timor bore NNW distant 5 or 6 Leagues the Island of Rotte extending from St 75° Wt to No 67' West and the Island of Anaboa ^as Dampier calls it, or Seman as it is call'd in the Charts which lies off the South end of Timor bore NW. Course and distance Saild sence yesterday Noon St 55° 15' Wt 67 Miles —

Dampier who has given us a large and so far as I know an Accurate description of this Island of Timor, says that it is seventy leagues long and sixteen broad and that it lies nearly NE and SW. I found the East side to lie nearest NEBE and SWBW and the South end to lie in the Latitude of 10°.23' St Longitude 236°..5' West from Greenwich —

We run about 45 Leagues along the East side which I observed to be free from danger, ^and excepting near the South end the Land which bounds the Sea is low for 2, 3 or 4 Miles inland and seem'd in many places to be intersected with salt Creeks; behind the low - land are mountains which rise one above another to a considerable height — We continualy saw upon it smooks by Day and fires in the night and in many places houses and plantations - I was strongly importune'd by some of my officers to go to the Dutch settlement ^at Concordia on this Island for refreshments, but this I refuse'd to comply with, knowing that the Dutch look upon all Europeans with a jealous eye that come a mong these Islands and our necessities were not so great to oblige me to put into a place where I might expect to be but indifferently treated — besides I did not see any necessity we had to stop any where untill


Previous Page Voyaging Accounts Next Page


© Transcription of National Library of Australia, Manuscript 1 page 313, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
To cite this page use: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-cook-17700916